English 11: Salinger

The Catcher in the Rye (Novel)

1/3 to 2/2 (22 days)

Calendar Changes:

  • Wednesday (1/3): Mark up an essay for structural elements (5 pts.). Read and annotate the Background/Context reading from packet (5 pts.).
  • Thursday (1/4): ACT Packet p. 29. Journal Activity (5 pts.)
  • Friday (1/5): Write down 5-10 “main ideas” from the Background/Context reading (5 pts.). Begin reading “For Esme.” HW: Finish reading “For Esme” + do the study guide reading questions (this will prepare you for the quiz on Monday).

Important Links and Handouts:

1) Introductory Activity 1. What does it mean to be sixteen? — (created 1/2/18)
2) Unit Packet
2. Catcher Packet w/ Calendar (Spring 2018) — (updated 1/2/18)
3 & 4) Short Story 3. “For Esmé” Reading with Teacher Commentary

4. Esme Reading Questions/Study Guide

5. Audio Book 5. Audio for The Catcher in the Rye
6. Sample Group Presentation 6. SAMPLE CATCHER POWERPOINT (updated 1/10/18)
7. 7.
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AP JANUARY UNITS

Junior Novel: Huck Finn

1/3 to 2/2

Audio Book

CONTEXT READINGS

READ BEFORE WRITING YOUR ESSAY

ESSAY ASSIGNMENT

ADDITIONAL READINGS

Senior Novel: The Great Gatsby

Gatsby Calendar and Essay Prompts

Context Readings:

Essay Ambulance, January 1st 2018

Dear AP and English 11 Students,

Please look over the following directives/pieces of advice. They are based off the most common errors/issues in the final essays submitted at the end of the fall semester.

–Mrs. Lamp

Structure

  • Try to transition smoothly and logically from idea to idea within body paragraphs. One good way to organize ideas is CHRONOLOGICALLY.
  • Avoid bland and/or underdeveloped hooks.
  • Use topic sentences, and make sure they clearly help prove the thesis.

Content

  • Stop cutting off or cutting up the text evidence in strange or awkward ways.
  • Find the best possible evidence, and use MORE of it.
  • Avoid making multiple claims at the start of a paragraph or adding more claims when you’re supposed to be doing analysis.

Proofreading

  • Do not slip into past tense, and do not slip into 1st or 2nd person.
  • Watch your pronoun/antecedent agreement. You should not be using “they/them” with “one” or “a person” or “someone.”
  • Remember comma rules. Especially this one: do not place commas before a conjunction that lacks an independent clause on the other side of it.

MLA Formatting and Citation

  • Full-length works (like a novel) are italicized, not placed in quotation marks.
  • Don’t forget to title your essay; leave the formatting of your creative title plain.
  • You need to set up all quotes with some sort of lead-in statement. You can flow right in, use a phrase and then a comma, or use a sentence and then a colon.

Style

  • PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE STOP USING THE THESAURUS. YOU’RE USING WORDS WRONG AND WRITING REALLY AWKWARDLY WHEN YOU THESAURUS YOUR PAPER TO DEATH.

 

Introductory Activity for The Scarlet Letter

11th Grade Pre-Reading Activity for Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter

mural example one

 

Video One:

“Spoiler Alert: Stories Not Ruined if Ending Revealed”

Ned Potter, ABC News (August 12, 2011)

WATCH NEWS REPORT

Video Two:

Watch the summary of chapters 1-12 (the first half of the novel)

WATCH SPARK VIDEO (0:00 TO 6:03)

Directions for Students:

Now that you know “spoilers” can be a good thing, we are going to “spoil” the first half of the novel! Find a group of three people; when the teacher comes around, one of you will draw a number out of a bucket. Together, you will then read the summary that goes with your number.

Next, as a team, you must figure out how to separate your assigned summary paragraph into three smaller “scenes.” Split the three scenes up so that each person is drawing just one scene from the summary you all read together.

It can be helpful to label characters with their names and/or to write out along the top or bottom of the page some key information, like “The Town Scaffold,” or “Late One Night…” If you want to use dialogue bubbles, that is great, too!

You will need: colored pencils or markers and an 8.5” x 11” piece of computer paper. These drawings will be graded individually, so put only your name on the back (please use a writing utensil that will not bleed through).

Summary Paragraphs:

  1. Hester Prynne is coming out of jail with a baby in her arms and the scarlet letter on her chest. It is 1640, and she is living in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. After she arrived in America, her husband was supposed to show up on the next ship, but he never made it to America. After he had been missing at sea for two years, she had an adulterous affair, which resulted in a baby. Hester’s punishment is to wear a scarlet letter “A.” She also must stand on a scaffold in front of everyone. While standing on the scaffold, Hester sees her husband in the crowd! She is shocked; she thought he was dead! When Hester sees him in the crowd, he puts a finger to his lips so she won’t give away his identity. He is ashamed to have been cheated on, so, thinking fast, he realizes he can pretend to be someone else so no one will know he was the husband whom Hester cheated on.While she is on the scaffold, Reverend Dimmesdale tells Hester to reveal who the father is, so the father can repent as well, but she will not tell.
  2. Later, back in the jail, Hester and Pearl are almost hysterical with stress, and Hester’s husband comes to see her, pretending to be a doctor. He says he forgives her for cheating on him because he was so old and she was so young, but he also says that she must promise not to tell anyone who he is because he wants to find out who her lover was and get revenge. He decides to be called “Roger Chillingworth,” and he stays in the town and acts as their doctor. He is very smart, and he knows a lot about medicine from reading, so he manages to be a decent doctor even without formal training.
  3. The novel skips forward in time, and Pearl is now three-and-a-half. Hester and Pearl live in a secluded cottage away from the town, and Hester has been using her excellent embroidery skills to make money to support herself and her daughter. She finds out the people are talking about taking her daughter away from her (because they think her sin makes her an unfit mother), so she goes to the Governor’s house to convince him not to do this. Reverend Wilson is there, and he asks Pearl some questions about religion, to see if she is being raised correctly, but Pearl is wild and naughty, so she answers the questions incorrectly. Hester pleads with Reverend Dimmesdale to speak up for her, and he says God gave Pearl to Hester to save Hester’s soul. He points out that Pearl helps Hester remember her sin and repent. The Governor decides to let Hester keep Pearl.
  4. The novel then focuses on Roger Chillingworth. He is well educated in European and Native American medicine, so the townspeople are happy to have him as a doctor. They think he can help their beloved Reverend Dimmesdale because the reverend has been getting sicker and sicker recently. This is because he feels guilty – he is the father of Hester’s child! (However, no one except for Hester knows this, and the readers don’t even find this out for sure until later in the novel.) The townspeople push the two men toward being doctor and patient, and they even get them to start living with one another; however, the townspeople eventually begin to think Chillingworth is an evil influence. This hunch is correct because Chillingworth has already sensed that Dimmesdale is the father of Hester’s baby, and he is trying to get close to Dimmesdale by pretending to be his friend; he is hoping to get Dimmesdale to confess to him. The two men spend a lot of time together, and they talk about many issues. Chillingworth eventually suggests that Dimmesdale’s health problem is really a spiritual problem, but Dimmesdale gets mad and tells him that if he does have a spiritual problem, he will not confess to a doctor; he will only confess to God! However, when Dimmesdale goes to sleep that same night, Chillingworth sees his shirt fall open, and he sees an “A” on his chest that lets him know for sure that Dimmesdale is the father. Chillingworth then keeps torturing Dimmesdale by making references that will make him remember his sin and feel guilty.
  5. Now, the story focuses on how Dimmesdale is consumed by guilt. The narrator says Dimmesdale gives the best sermons and is loved by all. It is suggested this is because he truly understands what it is to be a sinner. He tries to confess his sins to his congregation, but he doesn’t come right out and say what he did, so when he says he is a terrible sinner, they think he’s exaggerating. They cannot believe he really is as bad as he says. Readers find out he is beating and starving himself as forms of punishment. One night, while everyone is sleeping, his guilt drives him to go to stand on the scaffold. It seems he wants to confess, but he is too afraid of what will happen. His cowardice keeps him from really coming out with it. While he stands there, he goes a little bit crazy, and he screams aloud. At this point, he thinks everyone will come out and realize what he has done, but no one does. On this very night, the Governor passes away, and after a while, people who were at the Governor’s deathbed start walking by the scaffold on their way home. Hester and Pearl always help the sick, so they come by. Dimmesdale sees them and asks them to come stand up on the scaffold and hold hands with him. A meteor then comes and illuminates an “A” in the night sky. In the light from the meteor, Dimmesdale sees Chillingworth standing there, and he is very afraid of Chillingworth (but he doesn’t know quite why). Chillingworth does not reveal who he is at this point, however. He simply talks calmly to Dimmesdale and gets him to walk home.

Directions for Teachers:

Have students share with the class what happened in their summary and what they drew. Then have them place their drawings on a bulletin board or one wall of your classroom. Make sure to hang each drawing up chronologically; you will find yourself and students referring to this mural timeline throughout the unit!

Final Essays (Fall, 2017)

For Everyone

English 11

  • The Scarlet Letter Essay Prompts and Steps Packet (Updated 12/11/2017)
    • Our packet. A step-by-step walk through for writing this essay 🙂
  • Tridib Paper (Color Coded)
    • Looking at structure/citation. Practice activity from 12/12/17.
    • Yellow=Claim, Green=Evidence, Purple=Analysis, Blue=Transition
  • SparkVideo: Refresh your memory by watching this 10-minute video overview!
  • Need help finding evidence as you write your essay? Are you looking for a certain word/quote? Here’s the FULL TEXT; this is searchable if you enter Ctrl + f (then enter the word or phrase you want to find).

AP Lit. & Comp.

Essay Ambulance, 11/2017

https://www.animaatjes.nl/cliparts/voertuigen/ambulance/animaatjes-ambulance-14522.jpg

Notes from Mrs. Lamp to AP and English 11:

Evidence:

  1. Do not cut out/cut off key parts of your evidence! When you read the evidence back to yourself, it should A) make perfect sense, and B) cover what you are saying about it in your claim and in your analysis.
  2. Use enough evidence. Often, it is best to use 2-3 pieces of evidence for a claim, to ensure you’ve done it justice. This is especially true if your claim has any depth to it.
  3. Avoid using super-long quotations unless it’s absolutely necessary. Focus in like a laser on what lines are actually significant to your claim.

Focus:

  1. Don’t try to do too much in your body paragraphs. Keep it simple. C-E-A works. If you want to use two pieces of evidence, then C-E-A-transition-E-A works. If you start making 5,000 more claims, either in the “C” part or the “A” part, it’s going to be very, very, very bad.
  2. Don’t summarize in your body paragraphs! In a body paragraph, you should ONLY be making ONE claim and then providing evidence. That’s it.
  3. Make sure you’re actually answering the prompt. To ensure you’re staying on topic with the prompt, actually use key words from the prompt in your thesis!

Creativity and Flow:

  1. Make your hook creative, broad, and interesting.
  2. Make your final few lines in the conclusion creative, broad, and interesting.
  3. Use transition words and phrases, both between and within paragraphs.

Common Grammar Errors:

  1. Comma errors, especially with introductory elements
  2. Run-on sentences, especially comma splices
  3. Pronoun misuse, especially using “they/them” when one should use the SINGULAR.

English 11: The Scarlet Letter Unit

Screenshot 2017-11-19 11.50.55Screenshot 2017-11-19 11.51.08

Study Guide

Essay Assignment

Links for Struggling Readers/Writers

  • SparkVideo: Get to know The Scarlet Letter by watching this 10-minute video overview!
  • Read Aloud: Some people find it easier to read along with an audio book.
  • Need help finding evidence as you write your essay? Looking for a certain word/quote? Here’s the FULL TEXT; this is searchable if you enter Ctrl + f (then enter the word or phrase you want to find).
  • Chapter Summaries: If you are a struggling reader, it can help to read a chapter summary BEFORE you read the assigned chapter! NOTE: DO NOT USE INTERNET SUMMARIES TO SIMPLY FIND AND COPY ANSWERS! YOU MUST ACTUALLY READ THE BOOK AFTER LOOKING OVER THE SUMMARY! YOU NEED TO ANSWER THE QUESTIONS NOT WHILE LOOKING AT THE INTERNET, BUT AFTER READING THE BOOK! YOU SHOULD BE GIVING ME YOUR OWN THOUGHTS, IDEAS, AND WORDS!

Extra Activities and Readings

 

 

English 11: Poetry Unit

PoetryReadingScheduleEnglish11


Poetry Terms Quizlet

Printable Unit Packet

TP-CAST Worksheet


Week One Poems (Text and Audio)

1800s: Sets 1-4

Set One:

Set Two:

Set Three:

Set Four:


Week Two Poems (Text and Audio)

1900s: Sets 5-8

Texts

Audio

AP Hamlet Unit

11/6 to 11/22

Updated Calendar (11/11)…

Note: On 11/22, the quiz is over Acts IV-V (there is a typo below).

Hamlet Calendar

Bible on Revenge Hamlet

Packet

The Text

Activities/Answers

  • Act I “Relationships” Activity (E.C. if filled out) Answers
  • Act II “Plotting” Activity (E.C. if filled out) Answers
  • Act II “Puns” Activity (this was homework): Puns and Paradoxes in Hamlet
  • Act II Analysis Questions (done in class): Answers
  • Act IV Answers on Twitter @MrsLamp88

Viewing/Listening

Essays